Impact of Macroeconomic, Institutional and Structural Factors on Inequality in South Africa

Income inequality especially remains high in South Africa. This article investigates the impact of macro-economic, institutional and structural factors on inequality across the nine provinces of South Africa. Using a panel data econometric technique, the determinants/ drivers of inequalities are estimated. The rate of openness (globalization) of an economy, the level of financial inclusion, the status of physical infrastructure, governance indicators, and socioeconomic and institutional factors are explored as explanatory variables. The article concludes with a presentation of the challenges and policy options required to address social and economic inequalities in South Africa.


Political Drivers of Inequality in Kenya

This article highlights the nature, domains and responses to inequalities in Kenya in the context of the current socio-economic and political transformational processes shaping the country’s destiny. It describes the character and drivers of inequalities and analyses the political, policy, programmatic and constitutional measures that have been instituted to address them. It also highlights lessons learnt and challenges in addressing inequalities while sketching their possible resolution.

 

 

 


Inclusive Growth and Inequalities in the Context of Structural Transformation: Evidence from Ethiopia

Ethiopia’s structural change has yielded impressive economic growth. With various forms of inequalities weakening the poverty reducing impact of this growth, there is increasing pressure for equitable and shared growth. This article investigates the forms of inequalities in Ethiopia and offers possible remedies. It shows that urban inequality remains higher than rural inequality, despite a slight narrowing because of favourable pricing for agricultural commodities and a large-scale social safety net programme. Key to addressing inequality is: sustaining the social protection intervention; providing decent jobs; enhancing opportunity; and fair representation.

 

 


Nature and Dynamics of Inequalities in Ghana

This article analyzes forms, structure, drivers and Implications of inequalities in Ghana; examines its political economy and suggests remedial policy options and challenges. Regarding economic inequalities, it shows that despite a general reduction in the incidence of income poverty, its depth has increased: with a wider income distribution gap between the poorest and richest households; marked disparities between the well-endowed South and the impoverished North; and a gendered bias in the distribution of wealth assets. Overall, the non-diversified nature of Ghana’s recent rapid growth has not boosted employment or reduced inequalities.
 


Gendered Asset Inequalities in Africa

This article looks at gendered asset inequalities in Africa. It shows that women have lower access to land; pursue largely informal and smaller entrepreneurial activities that pay less and have low value addition; have lower access to formal finance; and, have lower political capital. To close the gendered asset gap, there is need for: reform of land and financial laws; entrepreneurial training for women; affirmative action in key areas such as education and employment; special funds/programmes for women; and, use of quotas to enhance political participation by women.

 


Country Profile: South Sudan

After decades of conflict between the northern and southern regions of Sudan – which engulfed the country in two phases of civil war from 1955 to 1972 and 1982 to 2005 and resulted in the loss of 2.5 million lives1 – a Comprehensive Peace Agreement was signed in 2005 between the Sudanese government and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA). One of the key clauses of the Peace Agreement was the recognition of South Sudan’s right to hold a referendum on whether to remain part of Sudan or secede to form a new nation. A referendum was held in January 2011 and resulted in a 98.8% approval of the option to secede . The Republic of South Sudan (population 8.26 million3 ) was established on July 9th 2011.


An Update of Reproductive Health, Gender, Population and Development Situation in Sudan

Sudan is in a critical political, socio-economic and demographic transition, particularly in the post-cessation era, together with emerging national opportunities and challenges vis-à-vis the changing governance in the Arab region and the internationally down-turning economies. The newly two established post-cessation countries (Sudan and Southern Sudan) have serious disputes and a long trail to reach a peaceful coexistence. Although the Government has recently signed Peace Agreement in Doha with some of the Darfuri rebel movements, brutal fighting is perpetual in South Kordofan, Blue Nile, and some pockets in Darfur.


Poverty Trends in South Africa

Household expenditure surveys, like the Income and Expenditure Survey (IES) and Living Conditions Survey (LCS), are fundamental components to a survey programme of any statistical agency. They are an essential building block for the consumer price index (CPI) to stay current with the changing spending and consumption patterns of the country and are the best sources of data for the measurement of money-metric poverty and inequality. The consistent approach to the collection of expenditure data through these tools since the IES 2005/2006 allows us to measure trends in the poverty situation of the country between 2006 and 2011.


Inequality in Southern Africa

The Southern African region is characterised by unacceptable high levels of unemployment, poverty and inequality. In many cases, poverty and inequality are on the increase, particularly in countries in crisis such as Zimbabwe and Swaziland. Neither agricultural economies such as Malawi nor resource-rich countries such as Namibia, South Africa and Angola have been able to significantly reduce wealth gaps and the rates of poverty and unemployment.


Inequality in South Africa

South Africa is one of the most unequal countries in the world. It is often said to be the most unequal, but that is incorrect. A number of countries, for example Namibia and Seychelles, have higher gini coefficients (the measure most often used to measure income distribution) than does South Africa. There are a number of other countries that are clearly very unequal – some major oil producers for example – but, for obvious reasons, choose not to measure the extent of their inequality.


Page 1 of 1312345...10...Last »