Inequalities in the Context of Structural Transformation: The case of Senegal

This article analyzes the key domains of inequalities in Senegal. It underscores the high level of gender disparity in the distribution of unemployment that disproportionately affects women. A relatively efficient education system is nevertheless undermined by large geographically defined access differentials. In terms of infrastructure, the capital Dakar enjoys better access to transportation, schools and health facilities in comparison with rural and other urban zones. Agriculture and informal trade are crucial for reducing youth unemployment


The least Developed Countries Report 2014

At present, there are 48 countries designated by the United Nations as “least developed countries” (LDCs). These are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen and Zambia.


Government Impartiality and Sustained Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Many studies suggest that one of the main reasons for Africa’s dismal growth performance over most of the 20th century is its degree of ethnic fragmentation. Yet, there is still insufficient knowledge about whether ethnic diversity necessarily entails large economic costs, or whether the implications of diversity depend, inter alia, on the government’s approach toward the ethnic question. We note that economic growth tends to increase average incomes, but it also affects the income distribution. Then, if growth is accompanied by growing economic inequality, the perception of the impartiality of the government toward different ethnic groups is likely to be important for whether growth can be sustained, or whether sparks of growth will evaporate because of rising political divisions and internal conflicts. In this paper, we study whether the degree of ethnic impartiality in the government’s policies is related to the emergence of sustained growth in sub-Saharan Africa, irrespective of the actual content of the policies. We measure perceptions about the impartiality of the government with survey data from the Afrobarometer covering 20 countries starting in the late 1990 s. Our main definition of sustained growth is when there is a GDP per capita growth rate of at least 2% for at least five consecutive years. Our empirical results suggest that countries whose governments are perceived as impartial are more likely to experience sustained growth. We conclude that in order to ensure economic development, it is not only important to choose the ‘‘right” policies, but also to implement these policies in a fair manner.


Inequality of Child Mortality Among Ethnic Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Accounts by journalists of war in several countries of sub-Saharan Africa in the 1990s have raised concern that ethnic cleavages and overlapping religious and racial affiliations may widen inequalities in health and survival among ethnic groups throughout the region, particularly among children. Paradoxically, there has been no systematic examination of ethnic inequality in child survival chances across countries in the region. This paper uses survey data collected in the 1990s in 11 countries ( Central African Republic , Cote d Ivoire , Ghana, Kenya , Mali , Namibia , Niger , Rwanda , Senegal , Uganda and Zambia) to examine whether ethnic inequality in child mortality has been present and spreading in sub-Saharan Africa since 1980s. The focus was on one or two groups in each country which may have experienced distinct child health ans survival chances , compared to the rest of the national population as a result of their geographical location .


Socioeconomic Inequalities in Infant and Child Mortality among Urban and Rural Areas in Sub-Saharan Africa

Studies on urban-rural mortality differentials in Sub-Saharan Africa show that overall mortality, and infant and child mortality in particular, is generally lower in urbanthan in rural areas. Various factors account for this, including the high concentration of salaried workers (who generally have higher incomes) in urban centers, better education in urban areas, the concentration of public infrastructure in urban areas that provides sanitation services, including water supply, household waste and excreta removal and disinfection, and hospital infrastructure, with health conditions that are more favorable in urban than in rural areas.

This paper discusses the factors likely to explain the observed urban-rural differences in infant and child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. The paper addresses five points: the first two discusses the factors likely to be associated with excess urban mortality; the third assesses recent trends in infant and child mortality in a few selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa; the fourth point deals with the determinants of infant and child mortality, with emphasis on the role of urban-rural residence as a differentiating factor. The last point provides the most salient results and a few recommendations


The Unequal Benefits of Fuel Subsidies: A Review of Evidence for Developing Countries

This paper reviews evidence on the impact of fuel subsidy reform on household welfare in developing countries. On average, the burden of subsidy reform is neutrally distributed across income groups; a $0.25 decrease in the per liter subsidy results in a 6 percent decrease in income for all groups. More than half of this impact arises from the indirect impact on prices of other goods and services consumed by households. Fuel subsidies are a costly approach to protecting the poor due to substantial benefit leakage to higher income groups. In absolute terms, the top income quintile captures six times more in subsidies than the bottom. Issues that need to be addressed when undertaking subsidy reform are also discussed, including the need for a new approach to fuel pricing in many countries.


Gender considerations and poverty reduction in West-Africa

The rising poverty levels in Africa remain a challenge to national governments and the international community. In many African countries, poverty has become one of the most intractable and prolonged socio-economic problems. The authors argue that since women are generally poorer than men, poverty reduction strategies should target women and address gender inequality in access to and control of resources. This article, therefore, advocates for a more comprehensive approach to poverty reduction by highlighting vital issues that contribute to the ever-widening poverty gap between men and women, and which invariably retard poverty reduction efforts in West-Africa. Specifically, this exploration of the literature focuses on (a) poverty reduction strategies from the 1980’s to 2011, (b) poverty reduction initiatives and gender sensitivity, (c) gender inequality in resource acquisition and utilization and (d) women’s contributions to development of West-Africa. The article concludes by bringing to light some implications of gender inequality and poverty reduction strategies for sustainable development in West-Africa


Can the Community Health Constitute a Means of Fight Against Social Inequalities of Health? Case of Senegal

Considering the definitions and the basic principles which support the primary health care and the community health, namely the equity, the community participation, the use of technologies suited for the resolution of the problems, the multisectoriality and to have as focus of interest a prevention policy, we can assert that the community health can contribute in a relevant way to fight against the social inequalities of health. This try is a set of elements which contribute to make plausible this hypothesis by taking into account health policies implemented in Senegal.

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In-Migration, Inequality and Urban Violence City-level evidence from African and Asian household surveys

While average living standards are usually higher in urban areas, economic growth does not result in prosperity for all. Inequality among city dwellers is a potential source of frustration which could lead to increased risk of urban violence, especially if certain groups are underprivileged and suffer from social exclusion. According to common beliefs, rural-to-urban migrants are likely to suffer from relative deprivation and marginalization, which may in turn increase the potential for political radicalization and unrest. This paper assesses this claim empirically.