Inequality in sub-Saharan Africa

 This paper reviews recent research on income and non-income inequalities within countries in sub-Saharan Africa. It concentrates on research conducted by national and regional institutions and by international agencies in the region. Research on income inequality in Africa is a recent phenomenon. Most studies began in the early 1990s, with the increased availability of household budget surveys for countries in the region. The advent of PRSPs and MDGs, which moved the debate towards issues of pro-poor growth, also required discussion on the nature and trends of income inequality. Another reason was the lessons coming from a number of countries that although growth may be necessary, it was not sufficient to reduce poverty.


Poverty Situation and Prospects in South Sudan

Following the referendum of January 2011, South Sudan became an independent country on July 9, 2011. The new government undoubtedly faces daunting challenges ahead in a context of complex social and economic problems at the back of weak institutions and lingering social tensions. Sudan is one of the few African countries where household surveys at a national level were not conducted for over three decades, at least since 1978. As a result, very little was known on the state of poverty,income distribution and labor markets.


African Economic Conference 2009

Poverty reduction is the core objective of the Ethiopian government. Economic growth is the principal, but not the only means to this objective. This policy approach raises fundamental questions: (1) what are the mechanisms and conditions by which economic growth translates into poverty reduction? (2) How do initial poverty and inequality affect the prospect for sustained and rapid economic growth? And (3) what are the links among economic growth, income distribution and poverty in the short and long term? This paper is aimed at addressing these questions


Growth, Poverty and Inequality in Ethiopia: Which way for Pro-Poor Growth?

Poverty reduction is the core objective of the Ethiopian government. Economic growth is the principal, but not the only means to this objective. This policy approach raises fundamental questions: 1) what are the mechanisms and conditions by which economic growth translates into poverty reduction? 2) how do initial poverty and inequality affect the prospect for sustained and rapid economic growth? And, 3) what are the links among economic growth, income distribution and poverty in the short and long term? This paper is aimed at addressing these questions.


Growth, Poverty and Inequality in Ethiopia: Which way for Pro-Poor Growth?

Poverty reduction is the core objective of the Ethiopian government. Economic growth is the principal, but not the only means to this objective. This policy approach raises fundamental questions: 1) what are the mechanisms and conditions by which economic growth translates into poverty reduction? 2) how do initial poverty and inequality affect the prospect for sustained and rapid economic growth? And, 3) what are the links among economic growth, income distribution and poverty in the short and long term? This paper is aimed at addressing these questions.


Diversification and Sophistication as drivers of structural transformation for Africa: The Economic Complexity Index of African Countries

Despite the turbulences the western world has been experiencing since 2008, African countries continue to demonstrate some resilience. After decades of economic stagnation, most African countries have recently achieved sustainable economic growth over the past decade, and some are even among the world’s fastest growth performers. It is estimated that Africa has achieved an average growth rate of about 5% in 2012-2013, and forecasts indicate that it will remain the same level at 5.3%, in 2014 (African Economic Outlook, 2013 and African Development Report 2012). This good performance of African economies is the results of two major factors: (i) government reforms undertaken by governments and (ii) a significant increase in the exploitation and export of natural resources as a result of the recent high commodity prices.


Inequality In Sub-Saharan Africa: A synthesis of recent research on the levels, trends, effects and determinants of inequality in its different dimensions

The purpose of this synthesis is to provide a review of recent research on income and non-income inequality within countries in sub-Saharan Africa by African research institutions. This includes research conducted by both national and regional institutions and by international agencies in the African region. The review is to be used as a basis for an inter-regional synthesis of work on inequality by Southern institutions, which will in turn identify the gaps in the existing body of work to be addressed in future work. It will also be used to identify Southern institutions working on inequality that can contribute to policy development.